BAOS

Book & Lyrics by ALAN JAY LERNER Music by FREDERICK LOEWE

Adapted from George Bernard Shaw’s Play and Gabriel Pascal’s Motion Picture “PYGMALION”
Original Production Directed and Staged by Moss Hart
MY FAIR LADY An amateur production presented by arrangement with Music Theatre International (Europe) All authorised performance materials are also supplied by MTI Europe www.MTIShows.co.uk
Director SUE SAMPSON
Musical Director TREVOR DEFFERD
Assistant Director STEPHANIE WEBB
Choreographer ALEX STORES
 Eliza Doolittle HANNAH JENKINS
Colonel Pickering TONY SIDDALL
Mrs. Eynsford-Hill JENNY MOSELEY 
Mrs. Higgins CAROLINE PRICE 
Henry Higgins RICHARD YOUNG
Freddy Eynsford-Hill JACK BALDWIN 
Alfred P. Doolittle MARTIN SAMPSON
Bartender RICHARD COX 
Harry OWEN WHITE
Jamie JOSH VAATSTRA
Mrs. Pearce KATHY MAY MILLER
Mrs. Hopkins STEPHANIE WEBB
First Cockney TOBY AYLMER
Second Cockney OWEN WHITE
Third Cockney JOSH VAATSTRA
Lord Boxington TIM PRICE
Lady Boxington PAM RUFFLES
Two Maids MEGAN WELLS DIANA SANKEY
Four Servants ROS AYLMER TRACEY EMERY KAREN MCCLOY SOPHIE ROWAND

ENSEMBLE

ROS AYLMER
TOBY AYLMER
ADAM CAWSON
RICHARD COX
TRACEY EMERY
LISA HOLBROOK
NATASHA JENKINS
AMY-LEE LESLIE
KAREN MCCLOY
CAROLINE PRICE
TIM PRICE
SOPHIE ROWAND 
PAM RUFFLES
DIANA SANKEY
JOSH VAATSTRA
ROSIE VINCE
MEGAN WELLS
OWEN WHITE
Production Managers CAROLINE PRICE
Stage Manager SHARON WATSON
Deputy Stage Manager  JOHN EDDIE
Stage Crew
Fly Crew
Child Safeguarding  
Lighting Design MATT GREEN
Lighting Operative  TBC
Sound Design DAN PAINE (SPIN AUDIO)
Sound DANIEL PAINE GEORGE STEED
Set Hire  
Properties  LESLIE RUST
Wardrobe  JUDE IFOULD
Wardrobe Assistant  
Costumes BASINGSTOKE AMATEUR THEATRE SOCIETY
Make-Up & Hair BASINGSTOKE AMATEUR THEATRE SOCIETY (Dressed by BCOT Students)
Wigs
Front of House Coordinator  
Photography ADRIAN HYDE
Publicity REBECCA GREENHILL
Publicity Artwork Design RYAN STEVENS
Publicity Video Production OWEN WHITE
Programme Design RYAN STEVENS

Act One

In Edwardian London, Eliza Doolittle is a Cockney flower girl with a thick, unintelligible accent. The noted phonetician Professor Henry Higgins encounters Eliza at Covent Garden and laments the vulgarity of her dialect (“Why Can’t the English?”). Higgins also meets Colonel Pickering, another linguist, and invites him to stay as his houseguest. Eliza and her friends wonder what it would be like to live a comfortable life (“Wouldn’t It Be Loverly?”).

Eliza’s father, Alfred P. Doolittle, stops by the next morning searching for money for a drink (“With a Little Bit of Luck”). Soon after, Eliza comes to Higgins’s house, seeking elocution lessons so that she can get a job as an assistant in a florist’s shop. Higgins wagers Pickering that, within six months, by teaching Eliza to speak properly, he will enable her to pass for a proper lady.

Eliza becomes part of Higgins’s household. Though Higgins sees himself as a kindhearted man who merely cannot get along with women (“I’m an Ordinary Man”), to others he appears self-absorbed and misogynistic. Eliza endures Higgins’s tyrannical speech tutoring. Frustrated, she dreams of different ways to kill him (“Just You Wait”). Higgins’s servants lament the stressful atmosphere (“The Servants’ Chorus”).

Just as Higgins is about to give up on her, Eliza suddenly recites one of her diction exercises in perfect upper-class style (“The Rain in Spain”). Though Mrs Pearce, the housekeeper, insists that Eliza go to bed, she declares she is too excited to sleep (“I Could Have Danced All Night”).

For her first public tryout, Higgins takes Eliza to his mother’s box at Ascot Racecourse (“Ascot Gavotte”). Though Eliza shocks everyone when she forgets herself while watching a race and reverts to foul language, she does capture the heart of Freddy Eynsford-Hill. Freddy calls on Eliza that evening, and he declares that he will wait for her in the street outside Higgins’ house (“On the Street Where You Live”).

Eliza’s final test requires her to pass as a lady at the Embassy Ball. After more weeks of preparation, she is ready. All the ladies and gentlemen at the ball admire her, and the Queen of Transylvania invites her to dance with the prince (“Embassy Waltz”). A Hungarian phonetician, Zoltan Karpathy, attempts to discover Eliza’s origins. Higgins allows Karpathy to dance with Eliza.

Act Two

The ball is a success; Karpathy has declared Eliza to be a Hungarian princess. Pickering and Higgins revel in their triumph (“You Did It”), failing to pay attention to Eliza. Eliza is insulted at receiving no credit for her success, packing up and leaving the Higgins house. As she leaves she finds Freddy, who begins to tell her how much he loves her, but she tells him that she has heard enough words; if he really loves her, he should show it (“Show Me”).

Eliza and Freddy return to Covent Garden but she finds she no longer feels at home there. Her father is there as well, and he tells her that he has received a surprise bequest from an American millionaire, which has raised him to middle-class respectability, and now must marry his lover. Doolittle and his friends have one last spree before the wedding (“Get Me to the Church on Time”).

Higgins awakens the next morning. He finds himself out of sorts without Eliza. He wonders why she left after the triumph at the ball and concludes that men (especially himself) are far superior to women (“A Hymn to Him”). Pickering notices the Professor’s lack of consideration, and also leaves the Higgins house.

Higgins despondently visits his mother’s house, where he finds Eliza. Eliza declares she no longer needs Higgins (“Without You”). As Higgins walks home, he realizes he’s grown attached to Eliza (“I’ve Grown Accustomed to Her Face”). At home, he sentimentally reviews the recording he made the day Eliza first came to him for lessons, hearing his own harsh words. Eliza suddenly appears in his home. In suppressed joy at their reunion, Professor Higgins scoffs and asks, “Eliza, where the devil are my slippers?”

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